academstuck

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR GOING THIS BLOG! from aradiabotarisen

Ah thank you for liking it! I’m sorry we’ve been rather quiet lately— IRL upheaval does that. ^_-; But I’m sure we’ll be back soon! Thanks for reading! 


Sympathy for the Devil: Why Jake English is my second favorite Homestuck character

wishalloys:

My favorite characters in Homestuck hit upon things that are really personal to me, which also makes them difficult to talk about. I thought I’d try to talk about them anyway, starting from the easiest to discuss (for me) and working my way up to the hardest. I don’t know if I’ll be able to get through all three because this requires a lot of honesty on my part, but we’ll see?

For now, let me tell you about Jake English. This also has DirkJake discussions because it’s very hard to talk about Jake without also talking about Dirk.

Read More


SCHEDULE OF POSTS FOR THIS MONTH + NEXT

Hey Academstucks! 

Caitlin aka saezutte here. I am almost done with all of my grad school apps. ALL OF THEM. So I want to get back to posting here in a Serious Manner. Allow me to get my serious business materials together. [Caitlin puts on her suit and fedora.] Okay, now let’s go. 

Here is a tentative schedule for essays I plan to post. 

JANUARY 18TH: The Development of the MSPA Form, or Meditations on the Hussian Oeuvre, or Oh Shit I’m Actually Going to Read Problem Sleuth Aren’t I

JANUARY 25TH: A [Dis]unified Ethnography of Homestuck Fandom

FEBRUARY 1ST: The Uses and Manifestations of Internet Culture and Virtual (Video Game) Reality in Homestuck 

FEBRUARY 8TH: My three-fold post on Damara that is now extremely late because I Am The Worst 

FEBRUARY 15TH: Disability in Homestuck (vague idea as of right now)

I WILL PROBABLY TITLE THEM WITH SOMETHING PITHY ONCE THEY’RE WRITTEN. This is just my plan, I’m not sure what Brooke has up her sleeve write now. 

If you have any thoughts on any of these topics even now, feel free to write in! It will probably be helpful for my thoughts to discuss them with other people and of course, I’ll include you in the post / credit thoughts that I end up quoting. 

Also, if you have an essay or topic you have a post on, let us know so we can reblog and chime in! 


Let me reblog about Homestuck: The Answer to The Ultimate Riddle →

bladekindeyewear:

image

Does Homestuck confuse you?

Are you often beset by doubts about whether the villains of the story can truly be overcome, with all their commanding force? That Homestuck is headed toward a “downer ending”, the heroes locked in by the alpha timeline’s absolute…

My friend Anachrocollectivist just reblogged this to send it to us, so I’m posting it here and leaving some thoughts.

I recommend you read the article/post/theory before you read the rest of what I have to say! :) 

Okay, read it? Great!

I was reading this theory and it seems like a very compelling, well-supported argument to me. So, assuming that this is the case and the Ultimate Riddle is as explained above, what would be a greater meaning that we could take from Homestuck as a work?

One of the defining things about Homestuck as a story is how entrenched in modern culture it is— I’ve addressed this “capturing of the contemporary zeitgeist” in part in my first post that I put up here, about Homestuck and dark humor. The characters, the themes, the jokes, the art— all of it is a product of our time and reflects us as readers, directly and indirectly. Directly in the ways Hussie pokes fun at us in a stream of commentary that takes various forms (the Beforus Trolls, the Striders’ devotion to irony, the constant breaking of the fourth wall), and indirectly through the general use of modern practices/cultural tropes that are worked into the story, consciously or not (the way humor is used, the attitudes towards technology, the fact that this story in particular has found a large fan base that identifies with what it’s saying). 

So if Homestuck is going towards the idea that “Our collective will is what will define our future”, that, too, is related to the matrix that this work came to be in.

We, as a rising generation, are following the optimism of the 1960’s and 70’s, the era of youth revolution. We are following the 80’s and 90’s, the era that saw the failures of the past generation’s attempt to change society. We were born in this time period, and grew up in some sort of liminal space— on the one hand, we have new technology that is exciting and has unforetold potential. On the other hand, the world is still going to shit in a million different ways all at once, and hope is both alive and running thin. We are the stranded generation: forever stuck between these two poles. I use the word “stuck” intentionally. We are static.We are, and I’m going to hope that this doesn’t sound as trite as I think it sounds, “Home stuck”.

We are grounded at our computers and in our comfort zones. We have found a world online that is just as multifaceted and complex as the one we exist in, but one that also gives us a kind of equanimity and agency that we don’t have in the physical world— everyone begins on the internet at more or less the same level. We could be anybody, and that is powerful.

But, as important as the digital universe is to our lives, there’s a disconnect between our internet experience and our real-time experience. Things we feel optimistic about, things that have the potential to just get better and better online, generate a hopefulness that does not always translate to the outside world. Or, if that hopefulness does persist, often times we end up disappointed that our dreams do not match reality (I’m thinking of the first Obama campaign— “Hope” was the motto, and though Obama was not unsuccessful in office [debatable, depending on your politics] he certainly didn’t carry the magnitude of that original hope through his first term).

Basically, we don’t know what to do. Everything is falling apart (the economy, politics, international strife) and the important points of debate are often at a total stand-still. 

So what culture has that produced? A culture of apathy.

Apathy is “cool”. Apathy is aloofness. Apathy is James Dean in a leather jacket, smoking a cigarette and leaning against the side of a high school gym when he should be in class. Apathy is the mantra of the hipster, the playing hard-to-get, the  ”I don’t give a fuck” blank stare that has been honed over years of trying not to care.

Apathy is glorified in our social world. People who are passionate about things can have popularity and traction, but often times we consider those who sincerely immerse themselves in ideas and practices to be vulnerable— they show their cards and what they love, and by doing so can more easily be hurt. Apathy is taken in defense against vulnerability, as a shell that protects the individual from social pain and having to put themselves out there.

So, going back to the idea that Homestuck is all about “our collective will matters, that our decisions and actions count, that we will manifest the future”, this is completely against the apathetic impulse of our generation. Our will, our decisions, our actions all require us to open up and take agency in our future— our collective future— that we will create, because if we don’t stand up and will the path of the world to change, it won’t. Nothing will get better if we don’t make it so, and nothing new will be created unless there is some community there to create it.

I would be really glad if this is the direction that Homestuck is going in, because this message is increasingly important in our modern world. We have been so scared into submission to fate by past failures and by pessimistic thinking that we are letting forces outside of us to take the reins that we could take upon ourselves. We are giving up our agency. But if we continue to believe that “things are the way they are and nothing I can do can change that”, then we’re all going to hell in a handbasket because doing nothing means that every problem in our lives will simply persist and persist and persist until we’re all undone. We can’t let fear of failure override our hope for success. We have to do whatever comes naturally to us as people, and let the collective result of everyone’s will become our future— for that future is what we deserve, and if we are apathetic, the future we deserve will be a troubled one.

I don’t want to end on a pessimistic note, because this isn’t a pessimistic message. A pessimistic message would be “the world is going to do what it will do and no one matters to the future”. We may not all be titans of the universe, no one’s singular will is powerful enough to make great change, but we all must collectively try to reinvent our world, to make of it what we want. 

No one save Hussie knows exactly what’s in store for Homestuck’s future, but if bladekindeyewear’s predictions are true, then we can take away this much:

Together, our will can change the future and make success out of what failure once seemed inevitable.

xo+xo+

B


The second feature of [postmodernism] is the effacement of some key boundaries or separations, most notably the erosion of the older distinction between high culture and so-called mass or popular culture. This is perhaps the most distressing development of all from an academic standpoint, which has traditionally had a vested interest in preserving a realm of high or elite culture against the surrounding environment of philistinism, of schlock and kitsch, of TV series and Reader’s Digest culture, and in transmitting difficult and complex skills of reading, listening and seeing to its initiates. But many of the newer postmodernisms have been fascinated precisely by that whole landscape of advertising and motels, of the Las Vegas strip, of the late show and Grade-B Hollywood film, of so-called paraliterature with its airport paperback categories of the gothic and the romance, the popular biography, the murder mystery and the science fiction or fantasy novel. They no longer quote such ‘texts’ as a Joyce might have done, of a Mahler; they incorporate them, to the point where the line between high art and commercial forms seems increasingly difficult to draw.

From “Postmoderism and Consumer Society” by Fredric Jameson.

So I came across this quote in a English class reading of mine about Postmodernism, and I couldn’t help but think of Homestuck. Between the part about quoting texts versus incorporating them (“Life is pain and anyone who tells you anything else is trying to sell you something.” ~philosopher of our time, Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi), the part about the merging of high and lowbrow culture, and the fact that Homestuck itself seems to embody the idea that there isn’t an inherent difference between lofty art and internet junk, I think that this is a dead ringer for some of the facets that make Homestuck a postmodern work. I feel like Hussie would laugh at me for calling Homestuck a “postmodern work”, but even that just proves my point— it’s a crazy weird internet-bound phenomenon; but, the work also manages to make people think about it in ways that are more indicative of something beyond a “crazy weird internet-bound phenomenon”. 

-B


I read this on Thought Catalogue and thought of our Alpha and Beta kids... →

This kind of perspective on friendship in the internet age is a big part of why Homestuck is rather progressive in it’s views of interpersonal relationships— the relationships among characters are never downplayed because of the medium that they happen in, and it’s a refreshing take in a world that is constantly tut-tutting the idea of “talking to strangers”. Yes, internet safety is paramount, but there’s a difference between being reckless and being social in a new way. 

~B


comicallyvariant:

mizbingley:

cincosechzehn:

pyrope-pirate:

dabestredur:

karkatstuck:

no but seriously you guys like they just fucking described homestuck in 3 paragraphs and it actually makes fucking sense

oh my god

how

Any of my followers wondering what Homestuck is: here.

DON’T LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT HOMESTUCK
LET WIKIPEDIA TELL YOU ABOUT HOMESTUCK

oh is THAT what it is?
i sort of understood that!

Hi Academstucks! I keep seeing this on my dash and I started to respond and then I decided this would be better posted here.
See, Homestuck clearly has a real, linear plot. This is a great summary of it that is engrossing and will hopefully make people think Homestuck is more accessible. However, I never thought that “Homestuck has a plot” was in doubt and I never thought that’s what people were asking when they asked, seriously or sarcastically, “What the hell is Homestuck anyway?” Things happen in Homestuck, they can be explained, and they often conform to structural expectations coming from various genres and media.
But a plot is not the only thing that Homestuck has and, moreso than the plot, those other …things, such as the medium, the style of humor and reference, the fan interaction, are what lead to the confusion about what Homestuck is.
I’d say this explains the plot of Homestuck but still doesn’t explain why Homestuck is so popular, how the format of Homestuck works, or what the experience of Homestuck is, which is what I think people are really asking when they ask about Homestuck. 
(But if you need a plot summary, obviously this is a good one; kudos to you, wikipedia!)  View Larger

comicallyvariant:

mizbingley:

cincosechzehn:

pyrope-pirate:

dabestredur:

karkatstuck:

no but seriously you guys like they just fucking described homestuck in 3 paragraphs and it actually makes fucking sense

oh my god

how

Any of my followers wondering what Homestuck is: here.

DON’T LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT HOMESTUCK

LET WIKIPEDIA TELL YOU ABOUT HOMESTUCK

oh is THAT what it is?

i sort of understood that!

Hi Academstucks! I keep seeing this on my dash and I started to respond and then I decided this would be better posted here.

See, Homestuck clearly has a real, linear plot. This is a great summary of it that is engrossing and will hopefully make people think Homestuck is more accessible. However, I never thought that “Homestuck has a plot” was in doubt and I never thought that’s what people were asking when they asked, seriously or sarcastically, “What the hell is Homestuck anyway?” Things happen in Homestuck, they can be explained, and they often conform to structural expectations coming from various genres and media.

But a plot is not the only thing that Homestuck has and, moreso than the plot, those other …things, such as the medium, the style of humor and reference, the fan interaction, are what lead to the confusion about what Homestuck is.

I’d say this explains the plot of Homestuck but still doesn’t explain why Homestuck is so popular, how the format of Homestuck works, or what the experience of Homestuck is, which is what I think people are really asking when they ask about Homestuck. 

(But if you need a plot summary, obviously this is a good one; kudos to you, wikipedia!) 

(Source: popufurry)


Sibling Relationships— A Striderian Analysis of this Epic Tangle of Feels

[SPOILER WARNING for later Acts and for character death.]

I would argue that the Striders are some of the most beloved characters in the Homestuck canon. Who can resist the aura of pure, unadulterated cool emanating from behind those epic sunglasses? No one, that’s who. But beyond the fact that they kick ass and take names and do acrobatic pirouettes off the handle, they also happen to present a really interesting sibling dynamic.

Read More